DENVER URBAN HOMESTEADING

Denver Chicken Coop Tour 2014 Calendar

Buy the calendar and support our Chicken

Swaps. It makes a great holiday gift.

HOME  

 

Fall Events:

Colorado Honey Festival - Saturday, September 20, 2014 from noon to 4pm.  If you have a bee product or service contact us about participating.

Denver Chicken Coop Tour - Saturday, October 4, 2014.  If you want to show off your coop contact us about participating.

Honey Extraction.  We do honey extraction in our commercial kitchen during August and September.  Details to be posted imminently.

 

Dear friends and supporters of Denver Urban Homesteading,

 

We are in the process of forging a strategic partnership with Chef Julie Fenn to run our kitchen.  Julie brings a wealth of culinary knowledge to the Denver Urban Homesteading market, ranging from seasonal, whole, traditional, and above all, delicious.  Before attending the Natural Gourmet Institute in New York, a leader in health supportive cooking, Julie has worked as a registered nurse here in Denver and she has a comprehensive understanding of our relationship between food and health.

 

As we did with the Market, the kitchen operations will begin slowly.  The ingredients used will be sourced from the same high-quality, organic and local farmers who supply the DUH Market.  This is exciting for us.  Itís our first time running an operation like this and weíd like your input.  Please take 5 minutes to complete this survey and tell us what you would like to eat and what types of culinary events you would like to see. We need your feedback so we can tailor this experience to you.  Thank you for your enthusiasm.

 Go here to take the survey:  https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/9C6F3N3  (you may have to cut and paste)

James Bertini, with Julie Fenn

Denver Urban Homesteading

200 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, CO
Hours:

Tues 9-3

Thu, Fri 1-7

Sat 9-3 (when the farmers come)

 

 

Why we DO NOT support the GMO initiative, called the "Right to Know Colorado" law.  Obviously Denver Urban Homesteading and its farmers do not support the use of genetically modified food.  And we support the concept of labeling.  However, this law has no exception for small markets.  We will have to follow the same rules as multi-billion dollar supermarket corporations what with labeling, keeping affidavits, etc. AND WE CANNOT DO IT!  Anyone who has come into our market knows we operate on a shoestring, and we fear that the shoestring will break if we are forced to hire another person to make sure we comply with this law.  Or maybe we should just give up the free Chicken Swaps, Honey Festival, etc. so I can spend my time labeling instead.  Additionally, a violation is a criminal offense.  That's a lot of risk for a husband-wife team.  Those who have followed our travails know that we challenge government over raw milk issues, re-use of egg carton issues, and now (for the last four years) intellectual property issues, and we do it to benefit our customers and to benefit society.  But this law will give a vengeful bureaucrat one more tool in his or her arsenal to use against us when our next challenge comes up.

 

BTW, I have spoken to the owners of several small ethnic markets where we shop who are opposed to this law.  Obamacare doesn't kick in until you have 50 employees, and the ADA until you have 15.  But this initiative will require labeling by every blessed soul who sells food in this state.  Maybe it is time to come up with a labeling law that will not crush the many small markets in this state, otherwise we risk driving markets like ours out of business leaving us to rely even more on giant supermarkets and big agriculture.  My Russian wife, who was born and raised in the USSR, told me that even the Communists didn't try to regulate farmers markets.  - James Bertini

 

PS  An attorney named Trey Rogers who is a partner in a giant law firm who claims he helped write the initiative attacked my position in the Denver Post.  Mr. Rogers says it is really no big deal to find out which foods need labeling, which foods actually have GMOs, to keep track of all of them and then to do the labeling, including labeling of vegetables.  So would Mr. Rogers donate a few hours a week to do all this at our small market so we don't have to hire another worker to do it?  We think not.  Mr. Rogers says that we don't have to worry because we can rely on manufacturers and distributors for GMO information.  But the law says retailers are responsible.  I think Mr. Rogers is full of organic manure.

 

 

Home
Classes
Teachers
Organic Feed
About
Registration
Wine Project
Market
Bees & Honey
Chickens

Market hours and beekeeping store hours:                         Tuesday 9-3     Thursday  1-7     Friday 1-7

Saturday Farmers' Market and beekeeping store hours:  Saturday 9-3

 

 

WE NOW HAVE TWO RAW COW MILK DAIRIES DISTRIBUTING FROM OUR MARKETPLACE!  

 

Our commercial kitchen will be opened soon.  But we need a chef!  We need someone interested in building a business making use of the local ingredients that come into the market to make prepared foods that customers can take home, and to serve either breakfast and lunch or lunch and dinner.  Also, there is a possibility of doing special events for us and for the art gallery that operates next door.  The kitchen IS NOT available for other uses.  If interested, please contact james who is @denverurbanhomesteading.com

 

We are now in our fourth year of litigation to get our Facebook page back; so far despite actions in two federal courts/tribunals we have not convinced anyone with authority to even consider the merits of our case to cancel the trademark "urban homesteading".  Read updates here: https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Denver-Urban-Home-steading-Trademark-Issue/148774315190090

 

EATING PUMPKINS, local, organic, heirloom. MM LOCAL distributed here. FARMER LEDA giving her girls a taste of her raw goat milk

 

 

Ziva Chocolates.  Yumm!

Happy Leaf Kombucha now at the market.            Market owner Irina teaching neighborhood

                                                                      kindergarteners about the Angora rabbits

                                                                      we raise for fiber, manure and friendship.

We have honey from Detroit, where the       Local honey galore, plus unique honeys.     Public interest award we received in April

 city is going back to farms.                                                                                   2013 from the US Green Building Council

DENVER URBAN HOMESTEADING, Local Market (click for video)  is an urban agricultural center near Downtown Denver in a large commercial-industrial building at 200 Santa Fe Drive, on the corner of 2nd Avenue and Santa Fe Drive.  Click here to watch interviews with our local farmers.

Foods we carry:

 

VEGETABLES

Matt Slater brings in many vegetables in season from his nearby farm.  We also purchase other vegetables from local organic farms.

Wise Acres Farm is just north of Denver and they sell vegetables here in season.

 

MEATS

Callicrate Beef has many cuts of beef and WAGYU (American Kobe).  It is raised on their ranch at the Kansas-Colorado border and processed on site.  No stressful traveling and no hormones or antibiotics used.  Cattle get both grain and grass for what Mike Callicrate says is the perfect mix for the animals and for the humans.

Flying B Bar Ranch is just east of Denver in Strasburg.  Their beef is completely grass-fed and the ranch is certified as Animal Welfare Approved.

Harvest Acres is a small, family-run ranch east of Denver that has pork and goat meat.

DAIRY

Harvest Acres has raw goat and cow milk shares available.

Turkey Tracks Farm has raw cow milk shares available.

Morning Fresh Dairy milk

Mini-Moos Dairy has pasteurized goat milk and cheese.

EGGS

Our eggs are laid by happy chickens in open environments

Wise Acres: pastured

Chicken Tracks Farm: Pastured, soy free

Mini Moos: Duck eggs

PASTRY

Paris Bakery has breads, pies and pastries.  Speak French with owner Rinaldo.

 

HONEY

Unlike most supermarket honey and some farmers market honey, we know our local bee farmers and it all comes from them without syrup additives.

We have honey from east of Denver, west of Denver, north of Denver and south of Denver.  We also have unique honeys from Georgia, New York State, Prince Edward Island in Canada, New Zealand and Brazil.

 

PASTA/OILS

Pappardelliís Pasta, frozen ravioli and sauces.  Organic pumpkin seed oil from Wisconsin and pecan oil from Louisiana.

Capellaís gluten-free pasta

SOUPS

Wise Acres has dried soups.

CHOCOLATE/ICE CREAM

The POMM chocolate made at our market by the Chocolate Girls.

Cows Gone Coconut has non-dairy ice-cream made from coconut milk.

Sweet Action is a popular neighborhood ice-cream maker that uses milk from cows that arenít pumped with antibiotics.

Jack Rabbit Hill biodynamic wine (that means essentially beyond organic)

CANNED GOODS

MM Local canned fruits and vegetables.

Ela Family Farms organic fruits

The Real Dill locally-made dill pickles.

Rocky Mountain Orchards jams

SOAPS ETC

Lily Pad makes soaps with raw cow and goat milk

Sage Thymes has organic heirloom vegetable starts, handmade soaps

Our goal is to promote agricultural activities in the Denver metropolitan area for a variety of reasons.  First, for sustainability, i.e. renewing and preserving our energy and resources.  Second, for growing and raising our own quality food and getting in touch with food sources.  Third, for energy conservation.  Fourth, for fun.  Growing vegetables is fun.  Raising food-producing animals is fun.  Fifth, because a chicken living in your backyard and playing with a child is probably living a happier life than a chicken living on a factory farm.

We are not a big company, we are not a supermarket and we are not part of the industrial-agricultural complex.  If you want local food, quality food, the ability to connect with farmers and neighbors and even get lower prices than supermarkets (yes, we are lower on many items), then c'mon in.

Denver Urban Homesteading is an earth market and part of the DIY (do it yourself) movement.  An earth market contains local producers using environmentally sound and sustainable growing/making methods, preserving the local food culture and helping improve biodiversity.  The producers offer food directly to consumers at reasonable prices.  The marketplace is a social meeting hub and a place where consumers can get education about food-producing practices, nutrition and sustainable agriculture from the producers and from classes offered by the market. 

Urban homesteading classes/Agriculture education

Classes on raising backyard chickens, dairy and fiber goats, vegetable gardening, canning.  

 

Local Farmers' Market - Now open!

This market is open every Saturday from 9-3 and it sells high-quality, local* foodstuffs.   Come and meet the farmers!  We want to strengthen the bond between farmers and consumers.  We want you to know where your food comes from and who grows or makes it.  Many of these local foods are organic.  We accept Mastercard, Visa and SNAP (food stamps).

 

Local Fibers/crafts/spinning and knitting

We plan to offer for sale local fibers: wool from sheep, alpaca, llama, goat and rabbit.  We seek donations of old spinning wheels or parts of spinning wheels that we can refurbish.

*Note that "local" varies depending on the product.  Most of our foods come from a 100 mile radius, but some come from greater distances because they are not produced nearby.).

James and Irina Bertini

james@denverurbanhomesteading.com

303 825-0231 but we aren't open every day so we may not get back to you quickly.  Email is best to get ahold of James quickly.

Our Location (click for a map): 200 Santa Fe Dr. Denver, CO 

Hours:

Tuesday 9-3

Thu and Fri 1-7

Sat 9-3 (when all the farmers come)

Home | Classes | Teachers | Organic Feed | About | Registration | Wine Project | Market | Bees & Honey | Chickens

Last updated: 08/04/14.